Do Brands Still Matter in 2017?

5 min read

Are Millennials Blind to Hotel Brands?

Do brand preferences still matter in the Millennial generation? This question comes up because Millennials have shown an emerging taste for untraditional, decentralized, and independent local providers of goods and services in what is commonly referred to as the “sharing economy”. The sharing economy has undoubtedly made an impact across multiple industries.  Sharing economy leaders like Uber and Airbnb are estimated to grow to $335 billion by 2025. This significant growth leaves many hoteliers and investors alike wondering how the hotel industry will continue to change moving forward. Many are also asking if hotel brands matter at all? After all, Millennials seem to be happy with online travel agents (OTA’s) where brand loyalty doesn’t matter, or online platforms like Airbnb which reveal a preference for more communal, local, and location-authentic lodging experiences.

Despite higher preferences than their older counterparts, Millennials still show strong preferences for branded hotels.

The travel and hospitality marketing firm MMGY Global launched a study hoping to answer questions about these changing hospitality preferences among American travelers. (You can check out the full article here.) Peter Yesawich from MMGY Global has some great insights worth checking out, and below is a snippet of that report:

Source: MMGY Global

Highlights from the Study

Our team at EquityRoots also wanted to take a look at the study results to find a conclusive answer on whether or not hotel brands will still matter into the future.

In short, yes – brands still matter, and investing in the right hotels can still lead to a fruitful real estate investment.  It’s true that Millennials still show more interest in a shared economy, especially compared to other age demographics. Knowing this, are hotels still solid real estate investments? Yes, of course they are. Millennials’ preferences are still similar to their older counterparts, including high preferences for full-service flags like Hilton, Marriott, and IHG (77%) as well as all-suites properties (70%). Looking at cumulative interest across all age groups, we see that big brand hotels are still preferred by a vast majority.

The rise of the sharing economy doesn’t take away from brand loyalty. Let’s take a look at our Millennial Airbnb travelers as a case-in-point. Bed and breakfast operations have existed way long before Airbnb (and even before the rise of hotel room standardization in products like Hilton and Holiday Inn). However, brands like Airbnb and HomeAway are streamlining alternative lodging, gaining strong loyal users. Even though Airbnb users are staying in different hosts’ accommodations from trip to trip, many Airbnb users continue to use only the Airbnb platform to find those rooms. In other words, they are familiar with the brand Airbnb and choose to book through there the same way that many travelers today maintain degrees of loyalty among the Hilton or IHG or Marriott. Despite the huge variance that might exist on Airbnb’s platform, users have come to Airbnb repeatedly with some sense of standardization and expectations.

EquityRoots - Hotel Real Estate Investments Platform

Hotel Brands Continue to Evolve

The question now becomes “how do current hotel brands adjust to capture the sharing economy audience?” It’s a question that hotels are already taking steps to answer including by:  

– Developing new hotel products like Marriott’s Moxy, Hilton’s Tru, and IHG’s Avid that target the emerging Millennial preferences

– Partnering with Airbnb to provide food and beverage solutions

– Offering “local experiences” and trips that are commonly utilized by the sharing economy.

The hotel investor can rest at ease. Hotel products from strong, established hotel brands aren’t going away anytime soon. Corporate travelers and companies still prefer lodging with hotels, considering hotel brand benefits such as loyalty points and more established quality standards across a wealth of hotel franchise locations. If anything, the hotel industry is thriving, continuing a trend of growth since 2010 as hotel demand increases faster than hotel supply. On top of this increasing demand, hotel companies continue to innovate and appeal to travelers, whether it be through adopting new food and beverage options, creating more communal living arrangements or utilizing the latest technology to provide travelers with instant check-in and other amenities. As the hotel industry continues to evolve, hotel investors will need to keep a fresh eye open for both strong performers in the present day, as well as potential performers in the future.

Sources

“2017 Set to Bring Modest Growth for U.S. Hotel Industry.” Zacks Equity Research. Jul 17, 2017. NASDAQ. 

“Global Portrait of American Travelers.” MMGY Global.

Moyer, Liz. “Hotels, Feeling the Pinch of Airbnb, Promote Local Experiences.” May 29, 2017. The New York Times. 

Simon, Elaine. “Food-and-beverage an opportunity for hotels, Airbnb to partner.” Sep 22, 2017. Hotel Management. 

Yaraghi, Niam and Ravi, Shamika. “The Current and Future State of the Sharing Economy.” Brookings India. 

 

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