4 Great Benefits of Hotel Crowdfunding

4 min read

EquityRoots.com uses crowdfunding as a finance tool to raise capital for premium branded franchised hotels. We harness the buying power of the crowd to create investment opportunities in institutional grade assets that were once only available to REITs, insurance companies, and established players in the hospitality industry. Our crowdfunding technology allows even the smallest of investors to invest alongside professional real estate developers, hotel owners, and other like-minded investors. It’s a system in which everyday folks can tap into serious sources of capital for investment purposes. This capital can be structured as equity, debt, mezzanine debt, and sometimes even convertible debt – security instruments that are designed to yield a return for investing. There are plenty of advantages in crowdfunding investments. Here are just a few!

1. Diversifying Risk.

Hotel investors can diversify risk by investing in fractional interests in different hotels across the country. Hotel investors can select hotels under different brands in various states. Our EquityRoots platform allows investors to select multiple assets, and buy shares or investment units in different projects and properties, diversifying your investment risk by brand, by the market, by different geographic regions, or simply by the different types of hotels, whether it is an extended stay, limited service or full-service hotel.

2. Owning Pieces of Institutional Grade, High-Quality Developments.

Typical hoteliers and hospitality groups commonly pursue 80-120 room properties in secondary or tertiary markets. This is where barriers to entry are often less and construction costs are generally lower. However, in higher density urban markets such as Chicago and New York, hoteliers face much higher barriers to entry and construction costs are significantly higher. Consequently, many hospitality groups aren’t able to penetrate into those markets. Primary urban markets have institutional grade assets that typically cost $20-50 million and although they can take many years to develop, it’s worth the hassle. Institutional grade assets tend to have the highest average daily rates, highest occupancies, and strongest profit opportunities for their owners and investors. But because of their size and other barriers to entry, these deals sometimes become out-of-reach not just for everyday people, but also for proven hoteliers. This is where crowdfunding kicks in to provide leverage and opportunity that hotel investors otherwise would not have access to. By pooling capital from crowd, EquityRoots’ crowdfunding platform allows everyday folks to compete for higher-grade, higher-quality deals. Crowdfunding is now gaining access to deal flow usually reserved for institutional players like REITs and insurance companies, giving even new hotel investors a chance to enjoy the ownership of some of the most profitable opportunities.

 

EquityRoots - Hotel Real Estate Investments Platform

3. No Middlemen and No Commissions.

The crowdfunding process is very simple and efficient. Under specific exceptions to the securities registration requirements, broker’s fees or commission fees for buying and selling the investment are not permissible. Crowdfunding aims to make every penny of your dollar count in the investment, instead of letting middlemen walk away with your money.

4. Local-Concrete Investments You Can See.

Investing in property and buildings that you can see and visit is yet another advantage. Hotel investments are different than paper stocks and bonds; paper certificates that we can never see and often trade on speculation. Real estate is an investment that you’ll always be able to see. It has real property interest and physical improvements on the land. A family can walk into a hotel, point to it, and feel a sense of ownership. It’s a more rewarding investment experience than collecting paper certificates in a file cabinet.

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How Expedia and Priceline Impact Hotel Owners and Hotel Investors

9 min read

Special thanks to Christina Velasquez for contributions to this article.

When was the last time you used Expedia to book flights or a hotel room? Travelers often turn to Online Travel Agencies (OTAs) like Expedia to quickly find available accommodations, but that doesn’t mean that everyone is benefiting. Nowhere is this truer than in the hospitality industry.

This year alone, we’ve seen both AccorHotels (products include Ibis, Novotel, and Pullman) and Hyatt go head to head with Expedia.1 Hyatt, in particular, made headlines when it threatened to stop working with Expedia altogether, although just last month Hyatt admitted it would continue to work with the OTA for the foreseeable future.2 This isn’t anything new. In 2004, IHG actually left Expedia and did not have any listings on Expedia sites until it re-entered its partnership with Expedia 3 years later. Choice hotels in 2008-2009 had a dispute with Expedia as well, and shortly after the dispute, the hotel brand told all its franchisees that all Choice products would not be on Expedia.3 Despite hotel brands and hoteliers relying on OTAs for a large part of their annual room bookings, these disputes reflect a discontent among hotel owners that is neither new nor insignificant. So…what’s the big fuss about?

It’s a tricky game. In order to understand the Hotel-OTA conflict and analyze potential solutions, let’s first take a look at how OTAs work and they impact hotel owners.

Giants of the Industry

Every industry has its giants. The NBA has the Warriors and the Cavs. The tech world has Google and Facebook. In the hotel industry, we have the big three – Hilton, Marriott, and IHG – all established hotel brands that EquityRoots strives to work with in our own projects.  

But who owns the OTA world? There are two companies you’ve undoubtedly heard of:

  1. Expedia, Inc. has quite the roster, with an army of websites including Expedia.com, Hotels.com, Hotwire.com, Travelocity, HomeAway and Trivago.4 In 2015, Expedia acquired Orbitz Worldwide, which also includes Orbitz, CheapTickets, and Ebookers, among several other brands. Add to that thousands of other affiliate sites, and you’ve got one major player controlling much of how OTA’s operate.
  2. The Priceline Group is the other worldwide giant with a hefty lineup of its own, including Priceline.com, Booking.com, Agoda.com, Kayak.com, OpenTable, and Rentalcars.com.

These powerhouses alone hold incredible influence in the hospitality industry in no small part due to their all-inclusive appeal to travelers. Travelers using Priceline or Expedia can book not only hotels, but also auto rentals and flights. Planning a vacation to Los Angeles? It’s pretty easy to log onto Expedia.com, and search for a flight and hotel for your trip. Online filters generally allow you to specify dates, times, and travel budgets to best fit your needs. Hotel owners can actually utilize this powerful tool in a way that benefits them more appropriately – but more on that later.

If travelers search for hotel bookings in L.A. right now, they can compare pricing and offerings from the Hilton Pasadena, the Best Western Plus Garden Inn and Suites, and La Quinta. Once a traveler has made their hotel selection, an OTA actually handles the payment of the hotel for you. From the traveler’s perspective, it’s not difficult to appreciate the convenience.  Especially for travelers not loyal to specific hotel brands, they can use OTA’s to pick the right lodging for their needs efficiently.

How does this hurt hotel owners?

Hotel owners pay hefty commissions when working with OTAs, and increasing dependency on Expedia and Priceline can compromise sustainability in hotel operations. For example – let’s say you own a hotel in L.A. For simplicity, your rooms are priced at $100 per night. Chuck from Chicago decides to fly into L.A. for a trip. Chuck walks into your hotel, and requests a room, paying that $100 rate. Chuck gets to stay at your hotel, and you get to keep $100 in revenue. Straightforward.

Let’s compare Chuck to another guest at your Hotel, Erica. Erica decides to book her hotel through Expedia. She books the hotel online with the same listed room price of $100. Expedia handles the payment and gets that $100. Then, Expedia takes a commission and only pays you $75 as the hotel owner.

Whoa. What happened? Since Expedia helped you, (the hotel owner) gain a customer, the OTA charges you a commission. After all, without Expedia, Erica may never have booked at your property. The hotel owner has to pay a fee of 25% of the room rate – $25. This rate is pretty typical of many OTAs.

A distinction worth highlighting is the fact that Erica does not pay that commission fee. You do as the hotel owner. That’s primarily how OTA’s make their revenue – by charging a fee for hotel rooms booked online. Among all its services offered, Expedia makes 70% of its revenue through hotel bookings.5 That’s not to say that OTA services are not valued. Oftentimes, getting customers through OTAs is a great tool for a hotel owner to have. The issue is that the commission for these bookings are high enough to make it difficult for hotel owners to continue operating.

This booking fee isn’t a one-sized-fits-all setting. Hotel brands like Marriott and Hilton independently negotiate their own commission rates with OTA’s, and those commissions can vary depending on whether or not the booking date is a weekday or a weekend. Typically these rates range from 15-28%, depending on the brand. Independent hotel owners unaffiliated with a brand can face commission rates as high as 30% of the room rate. If your rate is $100 a night, you only earn $70 if your customer decides to book through Expedia.

Hotel Owners Suffer from OTA Dependency

Back to the example with you being the hotel owner. Although it’s true that you still get to keep the larger part of this revenue from Erica’s booking, you’ve been facing increasing costs in the past few years. Labor costs are on the rise.6 You’ve got to pay utility bills, mortgage, internet systems and other new tech costs to keep up with competition in the industry. With Priceline and Expedia charging the high rates in commission, hotel owners have a decreasing budget to cover more front end costs. In contrast, OTAs don’t have to pay the same overhead, brick-and-mortar, and maintenance costs that hotel owners have.

Additionally, a growing concern is that OTAs are becoming the norm rather than an alternative for hotel bookings. Younger travelers especially are conducting many of their travel bookings through online platforms like Kayak and Expedia. In the past, hotel owners were looking at a smaller percentage of their rooms to be booked by OTAs. As OTAs have grown, many hotel owners are now seeing the vast majority of their rooms being booked through OTA’s – this makes it difficult for hotel owners to sustain their operations without raising the prices of their rooms.

It’s important to emphasize that most of the damage is felt by hotel owners, not hotel companies. With or without OTAs, hotel companies still retain much of their revenue through royalty fees (also paid by hotel owners) and are more insulated from the effects of online middlemen.

That doesn’t mean that these hotel companies are completely safe from the effects of OTAs. When OTAs create a large impact on thousands of individual franchise owners, increased discontent among those owners push waves of communication to hotel brands with a clear message: something has to change. That’s what we are seeing now with several hotel brands now questioning their current working relationship with OTAs.

 

EquityRoots - Hotel Real Estate Investments Platform

Flights, too?

For better or for worse, OTAs are not going to go away in the future. If anything, they will continue to grow. Yet, hotels aren’t the only ones who have scuffled with OTAs. Airline companies such as Delta, American and US Airways have all at one point removed their flights from Expedia to protest high fees. To this day, Southwest Airlines still keeps listings off of OTAs because of those fees.7 Other airlines charge a fee if travelers book through OTAs: most recently, British Airways announced it would start charging a fee for many third party bookings on OTAs.8

Airline brands have even rallied together to leverage their fight against OTAs. Around 2006-2007, major OTAs got sued by several airlines for charging booking fees. The result fell more in favor of airlines. When travelers book airlines through one of the OTA websites, the airline still gets charged with some margin, but there are no longer any booking fees. Similarly, an Illinois Court gave American Airlines a win in their battle against OTA Orbitz (again, now owned by Expedia).9

Hotel brands could attempt to utilize some of the strategies utilized by the airline companies. Hotel owners can upcharge fees if guests book through Expedia or Priceline. Hotel owners can push for hotel companies to band together in a similar fashion as major airlines. It’ll take a high degree of coordination among hotel companies and hotel owners alike, but a concerted effort across the hotel industry could really benefit hotel companies and hotel owners in the long run.

Of course, it won’t be easy. Airlines are in a better position to challenge OTAs – because airlines own all the actual aircraft that travelers fly on; they have a unique position in that airlines own all of their assets. In contrast, the hotel companies do not own the hotels themselves – individual hotel owners do. The hotel brands give owners brand support in return for royalty fees, but they do not own the brick and mortar outright. This key difference gives airlines a greater reason to push back against OTAs, whereas hotel owners must coordinate with hotel companies on a large scale.

Hotel Owners can Utilize OTAs as an Asset

There’s an absolute need for hotel owners to put pressure on hotel brands, and hotel brands uniting against high commission OTA fees is incredibly important for sustainability. In the meantime, how do hotel owners utilize OTAs as more of an asset? There’s a definite stigma among hotel owners against OTAs, but there are ways to look at Expedia and Priceline as potential tools in the hospitality business. Hotel owners do have an opportunity to utilize OTAs like Expedia more appropriately in their favor. 

  • Utilize OTAs like Expedia as your research tool. Hotel owners can use OTA to shop other hotels in the area. OTAs are a powerful localized resource to see what your competition is doing in any given area.
  • Free advertising. The inherent benefit of OTAs is that you can advertise your hotel for almost zero upfront cost. Hotel owners don’t get charged if customers simply see their hotels on OTAs. Hotel owners pay the hefty commission if travelers book through the OTA.
  • Book Direct… Hotel owners should push to have guests book directly with them. Guests should use Expedia to search for the best value in hotels, but if they are booking through OTAs, hotel owners pay for royalties and OTA fees. If guests book directly with the hotel owner and brand, hotel owners benefit because they dodge paying the OTA commissions.
  • …and Invest in Loyalty. Of course, hotel owners need to recognize that it’s so easy for guests to use Expedia and Priceline. Utilize loyalty-building resources. Booking direct provides the opportunity to give guests loyalty points, and loyalty strengthens relationships between guests and hotel brands. Guests benefit from additional loyalty points and increasingly improved service from a long-term relationship with a brand, and hotel owners enjoy that loyalty in the form of increased bookings from repeat business (without paying commissions). If those points cost hotel owners 10% through direct booking by giving out those points, it is still cheaper than guests booking through Expedia and collecting a commission of 15-30%.

Marriott, IHG, and Hilton are some of the brands that have strong loyalty programs where guests earn free points for staying at affiliated properties, but if hotel owners are going to overcome high commission fees, action needs to be taken earlier rather than later. Appeal to hotel companies for higher degrees of support. This is something we are seeing more often now, and many hotel brands are actually asking their franchisees to leverage them further.10 Larger organizations like AAHOA can and already have taken steps to protect hotel owners.11 We’re confident in the ability of hotels to unite and overcome arbitrarily high commissions, and with strong efforts, hotels will be an even better real estate investment than they already are.

Sources

1. “AccorHotels Finds Competing with Expedia is Harder than Expected.” Skift.  Jul 31, 2017.
2. “Hyatt Isn’t Abandoning Expedia Just Yet as the Two Sides Reach Agreement in Principle.” Skift. Jul 31, 2017.
3. Schaal, Dennis. A Timeline of Online Travel Agencies Battles with Hotels and Airlines. Skift. Jun 21, 2017.
4. “About Us.” Expedia.
5. Page, Vanessa. “How Expedia Makes Money.” Investopedia. Aug 5, 2015.
6.Mandelbaum, Robert. “An examination of hotel labor costs.” Hotel Management. Nov 21, 2016.
7.Hobica, George. Battle Heats up Between Airlines and Online Travel Agencies. Airfarewatchdog. Oct 25, 2016.
8.chlappig, Ben. “British Airways will Start Charging a Fee for Many Third Party Bookings.” May 26, 2017. One Mile At A Time.
9.“Court Orders American Airlines Flights Back on Orbitz.” Consumer Reports News. Jun 2, 2011.
10.Mest, Elliott. “Hotel brands urge franchisees to leverage them further.” Hotel Management. Aug 21, 2017.
11.HNN Newswire. “AAHOA takes a strong stance on OTA issues.” Hotel News Now. Nov 9, 2009.

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The Benefits of Modular Construction

3 min read

Photograph of modular construction

Modular construction is revolutionizing building construction, especially in the hotel industry. Instead of having to build the entire hotel from the ground up, modular construction pushes most of the construction to happen off site. This type of construction is incredibly appealing, especially to first-time hotel investors looking for a smart real estate investment.

Historically, the construction for a hotel development occurs on-site. All your raw materials are delivered to the site, where they are assembled by various tradesman and sub-contractors. The foundation is poured and the framework is built. Each floor is set up, and individual rooms are then constructed and finished as mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems are established.

So what does modular construction offer? Modular construction refers to the modules that are constructed off site and then delivered to the construction site to be connected together. In the case of hotels, this often means that each room is built as a module off site. The rooms are shipped to your construction site and then the rooms are hoisted and stacked and sealed together, very much like legos. Instead of building your entire building from scratch on-site, you are able to construct your hotel into smaller sections that are later placed together. There are numerous benefits to modular construction, including:

Efficiency

Hotels benefit disproportionately from modular construction because most of the guest rooms are essentially the same and easy to replicate. By having most of the construction take place off-site, hotel developers often save time and money in the actual on-site construction, since the rooms are already built. In addition, because of reduced construction time, there are potential savings associated with construction financing being a shorter term. There are also actual material savings using prefabricated modular construction. The repetitious nature of modular assembly allows carpenters and tradesman to bring material wastage down to a bare minimum. Additionally, construction traffic delays are shorter, and your development timeline is shorter, allowing you to make it to opening day and realize a return sooner. There is probably a good chance that a prefabricated construction company is able to buy lumber, steel, plumbing, and electrical equipment at better prices than most local builders, simply because of their volume and purchasing power.

Quality Management

Mass production allows you to speed up not only construction but also allows developers to have better quality. Modular construction reduces a lot of the variable guesswork in on-site construction from room to room, ensuring that each room’s construction will be consistent and predictable. Even the tiny details like screws and nails go into the exact same place, for each room module. It might also be important to note that indoor factory building doesn’t expose the materials or tradesman to natural elements, especially if you’re thinking about building in a cold or rainy climate. Naturally, the materials stay dry and worker productivity remains high when you’re inside controlled environments.

 

EquityRoots - Hotel Real Estate Investments Platform


Conclusion

We predict that modular construction will only get more popular, and will allow hotel developers to speed up their rate of development without sacrificing quality. Moving ahead, modular construction companies are now even offering to build rooms with your FF&E (furniture, fixtures, and equipment) already built in, so hotel developers have even less to worry about when preparing to open doors and getting to revenue.

Sources:
“Why Build Modular?” Modular Building Institute.

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Existing Hotel vs New Construction Hotel – Which is the Better Investment?

3 min read

Existing Hotel vs New Construction Hotel - Which is the Better Investment

Hospitality entrepreneurs usually enter a dilemma when it is time to expand their portfolio of assets, particularly hotels. They are confused whether to invest in a newly constructed hotel or to invest into the renovation of an existing one; investments should be made after measuring the pros and cons of each situation. Sometimes looking at the bigger picture is more relevant than the current performance of an existing asset, so it’s better to evaluate each option thoroughly.

There are two types of investments available for hotel entrepreneurs; either investing in an existing hotel or laying down the groundwork for a newly constructed one. Your choice should ultimately depend on the cost basis, time, quality, and potential disposition value of each deal.


Existing Hotel

 

Whenever you decide to undertake the renovation of an existing hotel, two things are always considered; the cost basis of your acquisition and the cost benefit of changing flags, or renovating the property into a different brand. This is especially true if the hotel is located in an extremely busy market, center-city location, or in market where vacant land is scarce.

How will you benefit from investing and renovating an existing hotel over constructing a new one? Here are the reasons:

-If you purchase an existing hotel with operating history, you’ll have a very accurate look of what’s going on today, or what the return on your investment currently looks like.

-Due to the rising costs of construction and scarcity of land in reputable markets, the feasibility of building a new hotel is harder said than done.

-Assuming the property is cash flow positive, you can recognize income 12-24 months sooner compared to new construction hotel investments.

-When buying an existing hotel, you can safely skip the entitlement, design, and development process.

-Sometimes acquisition cost can be significantly below new construction replacement cost.

-Existing hotels often have financing that you can assume. It’s convenient not having to go searching or negotiating for a loan when you can readily assume a good loan.

As far as the risks are concerned, you will have to think about the following:

-Many older hotel buildings do not have adequate electrical, plumbing, or mechanical functions to keep up with the demand of today’s corporate traveler. You’ll end up spending just as much money replacing these systems as you would installing brand new ones.

-The price of acquisition with the cost of renovation must not be greater than the cost of constructing a new hotel.

-You might have less branding options as opposed to building a new hotel.

-Selling renovated or repositioned hotels will most likely sell for a drastically smaller premium than newly constructed assets.

-Your maintenance costs will never be as low as new construction hotels.


New Construction Hotel

 

Investing in a new development project can also be a risky but rewarding investment. It’s important to invest in reliable markets and cater to the business traveler.

Upsides to New Construction

New development & new construction investments have numerous benefits, including:

-The guest experience and floorplans of today’s hotel prototypes are more efficient and modern than older hotels. Guest are satisfied and leave great travel reviews. Everything is new!

-New construction hotels typically become market leaders with rate and occupancy because business travelers don’t mind spending more money to stay in newer hotels.

-Operating profits are very lean because the property manager isn’t always spending money on maintenance and repairs.

-Disposition is often very rewarding. REITS and institutional buyers demand the best performing assets and often pay the highest value to new or newer hotels.

Downsides to New Construction

However, new construction and new development hotels are not without their own share of risks:

-The development process often takes 6-18 months of hard work with engineers, attorneys, architects, and City Officials with another 16-24 months of physical construction.

-No income during the development and construction process.

-Building codes and zoning laws are different everywhere and subject to government review

-Construction financing is generally tighter and more expensive than existing hotel acquisition loans. There are plenty of lenders for existing hotels, not so much for new-construction loans.

 

EquityRoots - Hotel Real Estate Investments Platform


Conclusion

Both options come with their own set of pros and cons. Whatever investment you end up making, you should take into account whether you’re making these investments to supplement your cash flow or to maximize your long term gain. Both of these objectives can be rewarding, but take a look at the bigger picture which can often be found in a metric called “equity multiples”.

equityroots.com is website owned and operated by Equityroots, Inc., a Delaware Corporation and real-estate developer specializing in select service and full service hotel development. Equityroots found value in partnering with Intercontinental Hotel Group (IHG), recently licensing two of their most iconic brands, Holiday Inn and Holiday Inn Express in a dynamic dual brand design. The development was able to identify Class-A vacant site in a market with barriers to entry, it was an easy decision to pursue new development given the circumstances.  New development projects and investments often require a higher degree of patience compared to existing hotel acquisitions, but the added layer of patience is often rewarded during the exit strategy.

For more information on hotel investments, visit us at www.equityroots.com or sign up for our monthly newsletter at the bottom of our homepage.

Sources

“Hotel Investment: How to Finance the New Supply.” Hotel Online. Apr 11, 2014.

Jones, Michael. “What Does it Take to Start a Hotel?”  Forbes. Feb 23, 2013.

LaSalle, Jones. “5 Forces Driving Hotel Investment.” Building Design and Construction. Feb 5, 2013.

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Are Hotels a Better Investment Than Multi-Family or Fix-and-Flip?

3 min read

Are Hotels a Better Investment Than Multi-Family or Fix-and-Flip?

There’s no shortage of opportunities to invest in real estate—so why zero in on hotels, in particular? It’s a question we get asked regularly here at EquityRoots. Truthfully, of all the myriad ways to add real estate to your investment portfolio, hotels are among the least commonly discussed. Why is it, then, that we would offer our investors the opportunity to enter so specific a niche?

Before we answer that, we’ll offer the disclaimer that yes, there are many people out there who make money off of multi-family properties, fix-and-flips, and other real estate opportunities. By no means are we suggesting that these ventures cannot be fruitful. All we are saying is that, if you put all the pros and cons on the ledger and really think it over, you just might find yourself agreeing with us that hotel investments are uniquely promising and distinctly advantageous.

Real Estate Investment 101

To understand what makes hotel investment so loaded with potential, you’ve first got to understand some of the basics of real estate investment. Let’s break it down to the simplest possible level—the most basic concept of real estate investment. When you buy a home, an apartment building, or a hotel—property of any kind, really—you have to understand that it’s not going to make any money just sitting there empty. To generate a profit, any real estate investment is going to have to have tenants. You’ve got to have warm, rent-paying bodies in the building for it to be a moneymaker.

So now, consider the rent-generating potential of a hotel versus other forms of investment. With a hotel, you’re generating rent money night by night. With most anything else, you’re talking about a month-to-month or even year-to-year lease.

It boils down to simple mathematics, then: With a multi-family unit, you may generate $1,200 per month. With a hotel, it may be $69 per room per night. Now, in some cases, the hotel may not come out on top—and there are other factors to consider, such as hotel maintenance expenses. But if the hotel’s in a good market, it’s got good management, and it’s associated with a good brand, we’re willing to suggest that much of the time, hotel investment is going to be uniquely lucrative.

EquityRoots - Hotel Real Estate Investments Platform

The Logistics of Running a Hotel

We mentioned that there are some hotel maintenance expenses to take into consideration, and indeed there are. For instance, you’ll have to have someone come in and clean the rooms and provide other upkeep services, which naturally eats into the hotel’s overall profit margin.

But even operationally, hotels offer some unique perks over other real estate projects. For example, with a hotel, there’s no concern over delinquencies or renters who simply won’t pay their fair share. You also don’t have to face the worry of your property being vacant for a long stretch of time; again, assuming the hotel has a good market, a good leadership team, and a recognizable brand, you can feel confident that there are going to be tourists and travelers paying for rooms.

Investing with EquityRoots

But all of this underscores the big reason why hotel investment is, comparatively, a fairly seamless and accessible investment: When you invest through a platform like EquityRoots, you’re not actually signing up to run the hotel. You’re investing in an experienced hotel management team with a peerless track record and a trustworthy flag on its pole. In fact, EquityRoots has sufficient clout in the hotel industry that we can gain access to The Big 4—Marriott, Hilton, IHG, and Hyatt.

Those brands aren’t available to just anyone—not even investors with huge wads of money or a few years of actual hotel experience. They only trust their coveted name recognition to truly seasoned, expert hoteliers—and EquityRoots is proud to be on that list.

The bottom line: An investment with EquityRoots is smart. We know the hotel business. We choose promising markets and ensure that our hotels are well-run and that they offer brand recognition. All the pieces are in place for a robust, fruitful real estate investment.

Learn more about it by contacting EquityRoots today!

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